Anime That Saves Anime

I think it’s a small exaggeration to say that this season is the season where anime saves anime. By that I mean while as an avid viewer like myself might find, at any given season, a good dose of TV anime that are worth the time watching, it’s rarely the case that I can pick up a show and recommend to the average anime-aware nerd who may even be keen on a few titles of their own. When such a show appears, those rare viewer types perk up to listen for it, and goes to fetch it.

I suppose part of this thinking came about because I have friends who may have liked certain thing (like Final Fantasy 7, for example) but would have otherwise find the offering slim pickings out of what anime output OTA to the tube in the last 10 years. It’s without any irony that I can offer Fate Zero or Guilty Crown to these guys. Okay, maybe with a sliver of irony.

The more interesting thing is shows like Hourou Musuko and Madoka Magica were pretty good, to pick something else in 2011, but they are much harder to access by those guys. It’s like the average video game/anime overlapping demographic of over the age of 28 or something tend not to lean in that direction. I am even wondering if Redline falls in that category (or not). But then again, 28 is pretty old for this stuff. The younger crowd would have had a better tolerance for a much more fancier chuunibyou material that didn’t have that backbone Steins;Gate demonstrated, or that sense of lighthearted adventure you can find in anime back in the 90s.

Is this why Kenichi is getting an OAV?

There’s just something, an intangible way that it makes you feel, that shows like Guilty Crown gives off. It’s like sinking your teeth into FF7 and spending your first few hours into that landmark game.

The thing is, despite the mind-blowing fabulousness that is Mawaru Penguindrum, I’m not so sure that even fits. Cute and funny penguins do go a long way to break down that barrier. It’s as if the show just wasn’t written for that oversea audience, though.

Which is to say, while I am much less critical of the new Last Exile than some, that intangible feel is definitely running thin in the pilot episode. Perhaps it’s just a case of nostalgia being less accurate of what it was, but it would be the first time I find Maaya Sakamoto not the most welcomed vocal in a show. I mean, great song, but it just doesn’t fit the show. That’s not to mention the way how the animation turned out.

TL;DR: Having boobs is great, but it’s how you use it that makes all the differences.

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7 responses to “Anime That Saves Anime

  • 21stcenturydigitalboy

    I can see it. Guilty Crown for anyone, Un-Go for girls, Fate/Zero for someone looking to take The Next Step, Gundam Age for kids, it’s probably the least insular season in a while.

  • jpmeyer

    If you’re a teenager with adolescent power fantasies and a giant sense that nobody understands your inner awesomeness, you’re gonna love this season! lolololololololol

    (Man, I was lol’ing almost nonstop through Guilty Crown, but that’s because I’m twice the age of the target audience.)

  • omo

    I was too busy looking at boobs

  • JELEINEN

    This is the most positive response I’ve seen to Guilty Crown. Everyone else I know is complaining about it being unoriginal and hating the main character. Personally, I love the look of it, but am waiting and seeing about the rest.

  • omo

    FF7 is a terrible game in a lot of ways, but it also did some stuff very well. I’m not going to argue that what appeals to a lot of people is a bad thing, at least without seeing what it is first.

    As for reactions, I’ve seen a large spread of it. Again, it depends on who you show it to.

  • Shockerz

    The ideas in Guilty Crown is nothing new but when combined together it makes my anime experience interesting again. Well, at least for this season. Last season was awful with a lots of poor quality shows. I can see potential in Guilty Crown and will see how it will developed into in the near future.

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